Ukkarai

Sneha is the Sanskrit word for oils extracted from plants & animals, and it also means “friendly” in Tamil, Hindi, and other Indian languages. Apparently oil is viewed as a friendly substance and it plays a vital role in Ayurveda as it purifies, calms, and nourishes our mind & body. It is no wonder that we follow the tradition of taking oil bath (ennai kuliyal) using sesame oil & heating up an oil pot (ennai chatti kaya vaipathu) with peanut oil for frying sweet/ savory stuffs on the day of Deepavali as it signifies purification, peace & prosperity. My mother usually makes deep-fried mundhri kothu/ suseeyam (sweet) and vadai / bajji (savory) on Deepavali.

Murukku

“Can you crunch murukku?” is one of the commonly asked questions when oldies meet each other during the festival of Deepavali. It is regarded as a blessing (or as a sign of good health) if one could relish crunchy murukku even at an old age. There is an old saying in Tamil “norunga thindral nooru vayathu vazhalam” (meaning crunching ensures longevity), it is considered healthy to take crunchy snack than soft snack as it takes longer time to chew, makes us feel full, and hence greater satiety.

Vegetable Fritters

Bajji are delicious south Indian vegetable fritters prepared by deep frying vegetable slices after coating them in chickpea (Bengal gram) flour batter. People with sensitive stomach used to avoid taking these fritters as gram flour causes flatulence & indigestion. So here is the recipe to make easily digestible gut-friendly bajji.

Neivilangai

Neivilangai has always been featured in our family’s Deepavali menu every year. These melt-in-mouth lentil flour laddu are popular among Indians & also Sri Lankans. North Indians use Bengal gram flour or wheat flour, whereas south Indians use green gram flour or black gram flour for making delicious laddu.