Kosambari

It is a festive season here, we celebrate a plethora of festivals continuously between August & November every year, and every festival is celebrated distinctively in different parts of India. It is quite astonishing to find how the cuisine, culture, and customs vary from one region to other even within South India. Kosambari is a traditional lentil salad popular in South Indian states (particularly in Andhra, Karnataka and some parts of Tamilnadu) offered to deities in this festive season and also served to guests at the wedding parties & other functions.

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Diwali Dumplings

Dumplings are not only traditional but also universal preparations, they are ubiquitous in almost every cultural cuisine in various forms be it boiled, baked, steamed or fried. Chinese dim sum, Italian ravioli, Nepalese yomari, Jamaican fried dumplings, Polish potato plum dumplings, British herb dumplings, American apple dumplings, etc. are some of the old-fashioned adorable dumplings that delight the gourmets across the globe.

Pesarat

As a child I used to shy away from talking about food fearing that I might be mistakenly stamped as a gourmand. Nowadays it is a common sight that teens are talking all about food with their peers with no inhibition, and there is also a welcome trend that kids happily wielding small ladles to cook up their favorite meals (thanks to the TV shows like Masterchef Juniors), and above all we could find gourmands proudly call themselves a foodie.

Piquant Poriyal

It is really challenging to prepare piquant poriyal using mildly-sweet earthy-flavored beetroots. I tried various preparations with different ingredients to make beetroot poriyal more palatable, eventually I found that sauteing beet root along with garlic in coconut oil adds a burst of flavor and also adding pepper & coconut aids to spice up the sweet beetroots. I have also added nicely fluffed up yellow lentils along with deep red beetroot chunks for adding beautiful color and delicious texture.

bpr7 Piquant Poriyal

Anna Payasam

Whenever I heard the word payasam, I was visualizing jaggery payasam (made using rice & lentil) aka anna payasam during my childhood days. It was a delicious staple dessert prepared in our family whether to treat our guests, or ourselves on our birthdays/ festivals, or simply to offer to deities at home on Fridays. However we gradually switched to other payasam made of rice adai, vermicelli (semiya), tapioca pearls (javvarisi), jackfruits, etc.  Nevertheless we still follow the tradition of feeding the traditional anna payasam to babies in front of the deities at home or in a temple when solid foods are introduced to them for the first time.

Ashoka Halwa

Ashoka halwa is a protein-rich sweetmeat usually prepared during festivals or special occasions. Ashoka halwa is also offered to deities as neivedyam and served as prasadam particularly for Navarathri. It is one of my favorite sweets for its beautiful silky texture and the sweet aroma, and I find this as the best alternate for kesari. So I like to prepare this often and serve for the breakfast on any special occasion.

Dal Tadka

Dal Tadka is a simple but a hearty lentil curry flavored with fried cumin seeds & red chillies. It is the most popular dish served with roti, naan, or pulav, and it can be prepared easily with commonly available ingredients in no time. Dal can be made spicy by adding the tadka (tempering) or rich by preparing the tadka in ghee. Without tadka this dal can be devoured as a hot lentil soup on a cold winter night.

Neivilangai

Neivilangai has always been featured in our family’s Deepavali menu every year. These melt-in-mouth lentil flour laddu are popular among Indians & also Sri Lankans. North Indians use Bengal gram flour or wheat flour, whereas south Indians use green gram flour or black gram flour for making delicious laddu.

Modhagam

This is my first post in the second year of blogging. On this first anniversary I thank WordPress team for their fantastic support, readers & fellow bloggers for their amazing encouragement and my family, relatives & friends for their kind cooperation, invaluable assistance & honest reviews. I also thank Lord Ganesha by posting the most appropriate recipe, a recipe for Modhagam that we usually offer to Him on his birthday (Ganseh Chathurthi). In this process of sharing our family recipes in here for the past one year, I have been learning much more than what I learnt through the years of my cooking experience. And now I am so glad to share a new method that I found very helpful for making soft silky dough for modhagam.

Sweet Pongal

Preparing Sweet Pongal used to be a difficult task for me when I started cooking, it took really a long time for me to meet my expectation of making sakkarai pongal similar to the one served in temples.